Vaccine Hesitancy: A New Challenge in Fight against COVID-19
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How to Cite

1.
Humna Rashid, Tehseen Haider, Anum Abdullah, Anoosha Tariq, Sajeel Saeed, Kashif Tousif, Arbab Osama Naseem, Naqash Haider. Vaccine Hesitancy: A New Challenge in Fight against COVID-19. sjrmu [Internet]. 2022 Sep. 13 [cited 2024 Apr. 22];26(1):18-25. Available from: http://supp.journalrmc.com/index.php/public/article/view/103

Abstract

Abstract

Introduction:Vaccination is an important public health intervention for the control of infectious diseases. To tackle the humongous upsurge of COVID-19, vaccines were introduced globally. Prevention can only be achieved if there is a high acceptance rate of the vaccine. On the other hand, vaccine hesitancy is the main challenge faced by the world's health system. It is seen among people mostly because of misconceptions, lack of awareness, and low education levels.

Objective: To investigate the etiological factors of vaccine hesitancy against COVID-19 among general population of Rawalpindi and Islamabad.

Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan.. Data were collected using a self-designed questionnaire that included questions regarding demographic details, the attitude of people towards getting vaccinated, accessibility and availability of the vaccine, the major reason for reluctance, knowledge regarding pros and cons of getting vaccinated, and prior vaccination history.

Results: Total number of participants were 403. Our results indicate that majority of the population did not believe in myths circulating regarding vaccines (81.1  % , n=327); however, 206 people (51.1%)  believe that vaccines can affect the newborn and 247 participants (61.2%) believe that people might get COVID after vaccination. Vaccines were easily available to 88.2% (n=355) of the study population, yet 78.7% (n=317) were doubtful about the adverse effects of vaccines. The highest incidence of hesitancy was found in males (Odds Ratio OR 1.12), married candidates (OR 2.27), housewives (OR 2.5), and individuals belonging to rural areas (OR 2.47).

Conclusion : Our results indicate that majority of the population did not believe in myths circulating regarding vaccine side effects. However, in those who were hesitant, the major factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy were lack of sufficient information about vaccine.

Keywords:Vaccine hesitancy, vaccine, COVID-19, pandemic

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